Watch for the Word Some in Your Story

image by geralt

In my readings, I’ve noticed many unnecessary occurrences of the word some. I have to ferret out that sneaky word from my drafts. But I don’t delete all of them. Sometimes some is the correct word.

Where the word some works.

Example

> “Did you read all of the book?”

   “I read some of it.”

Although some works, it’s a vague word here. If how much of the book read is important to the story, a more specific word is better.

Suppose the person asking is a contest organizer talking to a procrastinating judge. The organizer will want to know how many pages out of the total number of pages the judge has read. The judge would know that’s what the organizer is seeking.

But suppose the person asking is a mother talking to a teen who needs to complete a book report. Some would be appropriate for an evading teen. The next dialogue statement from the mother might be:

“Exactly how many pages have you read?”

Where some doesn’t work well.

Free-Photos

Example

> Daryl grabbed his phone and tapped in some numbers.

Some isn’t necessary.

< Daryl grabbed his phone and tapped in numbers.

This is more concise and punchier.

Example

> I wish you’d write some more tips on your blog.

Does the speaker want the blogger to write more tips, or does the speaker wish to limit the number to a few more tips. Probably the former. Some isn’t necessary.

< I wish you’d write more tips on your blog.

Example

> Jerry poked some ruffles on her sleeve.

This sounds like Jerry singled out particular ruffles to poke.

< He poked the ruffles on her sleeve.

image by dietmaha

Example

< They played some tennis before getting ready for dinner.

Some is unnecessary or, if necessary, is imprecise.

> We played tennis before getting ready for dinner.

We played two sets of tennis before getting ready for dinner.

Example

> She’d softened her attitude some toward him and given him hope.

Some used for degrees is vague and doesn’t add to the meaning of this sentence. It causes wordiness. The word softened already assumes a degree compared to changed her attitude.

< She’d softened her attitude toward him and given him hope.

Example

> We have some exciting news, girls. You’re going to have a brother.

This sounds like the parents have only a part of the exciting new that they could have. Remove some, and the excitement of the statement rises.

We have exciting news, girls. You’re going to have a brother.

As in the last example, some becomes a weasel word, sucking the life out of adjacent words. Some sucked the life out of exciting.

Watch for the word some; it can be vague and unnecessary. Click to tweet.

What are other vague, unnecessary words?

Buy Link 

Suddenly unemployed, Allie Masterson returns home to Cary, North Carolina where she caddies for her father on the PGA Seniors Tour. There, she encounters a man who possesses an alluring gift of reading the contours of the green. Fascinated with his uncanny ability, Allie is excited to meet the Green Whisperer—until she discovers that the easygoing caddy is actually Shoo Leonard, the boy who teased her relentlessly when they were kids. Despite Allie’s reservations, when Shoo is faced with having to overcome a hand injury, she agrees to use her sport science degree to become his trainer…and then she falls for him.

 Shoo Leonard is grateful to Allie for her singular determination to get him ready for the PGA tour, but he isn’t ready for anything more. Still raw from a broken engagement and focused on his career, he’s content to be her fist-bumping buddy…but then he falls for her.

What seems like a happily-ever-after on the horizon takes a turn when Allie decides she’s become a distraction to Shoo’s career. Is it time for her to step away or can The Putting Green Whisperer find the right words to make her stay?

A Book Promotion Idea Costing Less Than $20

 

One of the best things I do for under $20 is buy Kindle gift e-books for my titles when they’re on sale for 99¢. I have them sent to my email address, then, as I need them, I forward them to readers. The readers click on the gift link and download the book.

Here are some ways I use the 20 (or more) books I purchase.

  • Giveaways for online parties.

Example: I have joined Facebook parties. During my half hour spot, I give away one to two books. Affordable at 99¢ per book. If I’m pressed for time, sometimes I just send memes of my titles that the party organizer inserts for extra giveaways. I offer one to two books. When I send winners their free books, I ask for a review (ask not push).

  • Giveaways for promotion site events.

Example: I pay AXP (Author Cross Promotions) $30 for their Classic Read & Review program. This AXP event is a program to  gain reviews, and the readers know this before they request a book. AXP puts my title on their site. Readers, tell AXP they want to read my book. AXP sends me their email addresses (good for email lists). I take advantage of building relationships with readers and ask if they can accept a Kindle gift book. Those still interested send me an email, then I forward one of my gift books to them, asking for a review. Even though all don’t post reviews, my title does get reviews. Sending 99¢ copies keeps the cost manageable.

  • Blog giveaways.

Example: When a book is coming out, I sign up for blogs to promote my book. Many hosts request I give away a book. For my Twisty Creek series, I’ll be able to send a 99¢ e-book copy of Book 1 to winners of blog contests to interest them in reading Book 2.

  • Thank you gifts to your street team or influencers.

Example:I  searched for popular Kindle books on sale for 99¢, and bought a bunch to give to the people who helped me promote my book. I didn’t give away my own books, because most of my team had already read my books.

  • Spontaneous giveaways. It’s nice to have 99¢ e-books on hand to giveaway for any reason.

Why you should buy twenty Kindle Gift e-books when your books are on sale for 99¢. Click to tweet.

What other ways can authors use 99¢ Kindle Gift e-books?

Buy Link 

Suddenly unemployed, Allie Masterson returns home to Cary, North Carolina where she caddies for her father on the PGA Seniors Tour. There, she encounters a man who possesses an alluring gift of reading the contours of the green. Fascinated with his uncanny ability, Allie is excited to meet the Green Whisperer—until she discovers that the easygoing caddy is actually Shoo Leonard, the boy who teased her relentlessly when they were kids. Despite Allie’s reservations, when Shoo is faced with having to overcome a hand injury, she agrees to use her sport science degree to become his trainer…and then she falls for him.

 Shoo Leonard is grateful to Allie for her singular determination to get him ready for the PGA tour, but he isn’t ready for anything more. Still raw from a broken engagement and focused on his career, he’s content to be her fist-bumping buddy…but then he falls for her.

What seems like a happily-ever-after on the horizon takes a turn when Allie decides she’s become a distraction to Shoo’s career. Is it time for her to step away or can The Putting Green Whisperer find the right words to make her stay?

Less Common Interview Questions for Blog Author Interviews

image by kimono
Releases tomorrow.

For The Putting Green Whisperer releasing tomorrow, I had a stack of interviews for which I answered bloggers’ questions. At first, I liked the common questions, but was ashamed at the reason. I could copy those answers from other interviews and get the interview job done.

After I’d worked on answering a few unusual questions, I realized they revealed more about me and my story. Below, I list some less common interview questions that may tell more about an author and the author’s book.

 

Less Common Interview Questions About the Author

 

image by StartupStockPhotos
  1. What was the most surprising thing you learned about yourself as you wrote this book?
  2. What was the best money you ever spent for your writing career?
  3. What does literary success look like to you?
  4. How could reading your readers’ reviews and comments help you?
  5. Have you met any of your favorite authors? What was the moment like?
  6. Is it true that being a published author is glamorous? Why or why not?
  7. Were you an avid reader as a child? What did you read?
  8. How does your faith affect your writing?
  9. What would you be doing if you weren’t writing?
  10. If you could be a fictional character from literature for one day, who would you be and why?
  11. If you were a pair shoes, what style, brand, and color would you be?
  12. If you’ve been on a writer’s retreat, what was the greatest benefit to you?
  13. What is one book that made you cry and why?
  14. How does writing affect your energy level?
  15. What’s more important to you, to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?
  16. What was an early experience where you learned that language had power?
  17. What writing groups or events do you attend, and what are the benefits?
  18. What is an interesting event that occurred in your life?

Less Common Interview Questions About the Book

 

image by Efraimstochter
  1. What did you edit out of this book and why?
  2. What do you love about this story?
  3. What do you hope readers will tell others about this book?
  4. What holiday would your main character enjoy celebrating most and why?
  5. How is your main character more similar or different than you in personality?
  6. What would your protagonist say about how you’ve put him/her in the story?

Less common author interview questions can reveal more about authors and their novels. Click to tweet.

What other less common questions have you asked or been asked for author interviews?

Pre-order Link Releases tomorrow.

Suddenly unemployed, Allie Masterson returns home to Cary, North Carolina where she caddies for her father on the PGA Seniors Tour. There, she encounters a man who possesses an alluring gift of reading the contours of the green. Fascinated with his uncanny ability, Allie is excited to meet the Green Whisperer—until she discovers that the easygoing caddy is actually Shoo Leonard, the boy who teased her relentlessly when they were kids. Despite Allie’s reservations, when Shoo is faced with having to overcome a hand injury, she agrees to use her sport science degree to become his trainer…and then she falls for him.

 Shoo Leonard is grateful to Allie for her singular determination to get him ready for the PGA tour, but he isn’t ready for anything more. Still raw from a broken engagement and focused on his career, he’s content to be her fist-bumping buddy…but then he falls for her.

What seems like a happily-ever-after on the horizon takes a turn when Allie decides she’s become a distraction to Shoo’s career. Is it time for her to step away or can The Putting Green Whisperer find the right words to make her stay?