Diary of a Book Marketing Plan-Entry 7-Goodreads Ad & More

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This is the seventh in the series in which I share tasks and progress on my book-marketing plan for my second book. Gift of the Magpie came out August 15, but all my diary posts share my activities from two weeks in the past.

Among other activities, my prior posts covered my setup, recruiting influencers, guest posting, a book launch party, a newsletter, blog interviews, Facebook parties, and Ask David Tweets.

Tasks Performed This Past Week

Announcements 

image by Thor_Deichmann

This week, my second book released and I’ve announced it several ways, some of which are below.  It’s hard to know yet how effective my announcements are, especially when for the past three days, Amazon’s Author Central experienced a delay in updating my Author Rank.

Newsletter

I published the newsletter I wrote on MailChimp three weeks ago.

Ask David Tweets

I’m publishing two tweets a night, rotating pairs of six popular hashtags with the tagline: “Ten years ago, Camden crushed her heart. Guess who just moved in across the street.”

I added the e-book price reduction to my scheduled tweets for the duration of Amazon’s sale.

image by Maialisa

Email List

I sent 280 emails using the addresses I’ve collected since promoting my first book. They’re from friends, family, and people who provided their addresses at signings, workshops, and fairs.

I kept the announcement simple.

Ÿ• For people’s privacy, I sent emails under “Undisclosed recipients” and blind copies.

Ÿ• Email subject: Gift of the Magpie Book Release

Ÿ• Attachment: Large Book Cover

Ÿ• Content: Back cover blurb

Ÿ• Call to action: “Order your copy today by clicking on the Amazon button below!”

Ÿ• Amazon button: links to Gift of the Magpie’s Amazon purchase page.

Influencers

I emailed my influencers the information they need. I’ve started to see their honest, voluntary reviews on Amazon, my publisher’s site, and Goodreads. Those active on Facebook and Twitter began posting on their feeds and liking and sharing my announcements.

I asked them to announce Amazon’s sale on Gift of the Magpie for $0.99.

My agent announced the release to her client base.

Guest Blogs

Three of my guest blog posts published this week. Hosts shared my cover, bio, blurb, and purchase link.

Online Promotion

Facebook Party

I’ll host a half-hour slot next week on a multiple-author Facebook party. I sent invitations through Goodreads.

Program for Possible Reviews

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I purchased Authors Cross Promotion’s Elite option. They post books to their review/readers. These readers can ask me for a free e-book. I can develop a relationship with them, and hopefully, they’ll write reviews on Amazon.

During Amazon’s $0.99 sale of my Kindle version, I bought several gift codes to use with Authors Cross Promotion.

Facebook Boost 

I boosted another Facebook post, using the audiences of the limited authors available in my genre.

Goodreads Ad

Goodreads accesses readers. It allows me to target the exact authors who write books similar to mine. My ad runs until my budget runs out. My budget is reduced every time a reader clicks on my link. They email a daily report of views, clicks, and amount spent.

Book Marketing Diary – Entry 7: Goodreads Ads & other actual promotion activities. Click to tweet.

Authors, what has your experience been with Goodreads ads?

Amazon Link

Amanda Larrowe’s lack of trust sabotages her relationships. The English teacher and award-winning author of middle-grade adventure books for boys has shut off communication with friends and family to meet her January 2 book deadline. Now, in the deepest snow accumulation Richmond, Virginia has experienced in years, Camden Lancaster moves in across the street. After ten years, her heart still smarts from the humiliating aftermath of their perfect high school Valentine’s Day date. He may have transformed into a handsome, amiable man, but his likeability doesn’t instill trust in Amanda’s heart. When Cam doesn’t recognize her on their first two encounters, she thinks it’s safe to be his fair-weather neighbor. Boy is she wrong.

Diary of a Book Marketing Plan-Entry 6-Ask David Tweets & More

image by geralt

This is the sixth entry in the series in which I share the tasks and progress on my book-marketing experience for my second book. Gift of the Magpie came out August 15, but this and all my diary posts share my activities from two weeks in the past.

Among other activities, my prior posts covered my setup, recruiting influencers, guest posting, a book launch party, a newsletter, blog interviews, and Facebook parties.

Tasks Performed This Past Week

 

Book Launch Party

As I related in last week’s post, I had to reschedule the party. All rescheduling tasks have been performed, and 120 postcard invitations are ready to mail.

Influencers

I’ve received emails from 40% of my influencers, saying they’ve read my book. Their encouraging feedback was what I needed as the release day approaches next week.

Some said they were glad to help me because they’ll be promoting a first book soon. They anticipated learning from my experience. I hope it helps them.

image by Alexas_Fotos

I drafted the email I’ll send to my influencers the day before my book releases, which

provides them with my book cover, blurb, book purchase and Goodreads links, and endorsements.

repeats the promotion options I listed in my welcome email, but this time I supplied the information and links they’ll need, e.g. pre-written tweets and Facebook messages. I stepped them through how to leave reviews on bookstore and Goodreads sites.

reorders the tasks, starting with the ones I thought would have the most impact. For me, honest reviews is number one.

Tip: Send a test email to someone who’s not an online expert. See if the cover and links come through as expected. Your test person can suggest how to make tasks easier for your influencers.

Online Promotion

 

Ask David Tweets

I purchased two sets of Ask David links and plan to send two tweets per night for a month.

image by OpenClipart-Vectors

For $10, you can purchase 30 links from Ask David with the capability to announce your book to their 57,500 followers. Once you buy the links:

  1. click on one, and a form pops up
  2. Follow the directions

you are given several options including a request that your cover be added to your tweet and a link to be added (I will use my purchase link)

they tell you how long your tweet message can be

they have a tweet scheduling option.

Tip: Your tweet should include a book hook and up to two hashtags. Make sure your hashtags are popular for your type of readers. For example, #romance.

Tip: It seems readers look for books in the evening.

Tip: When you send more than one tweet per day, Ask David recommends you attach a unique photo (book cover) once. Twitter frowns upon feeds flooded with the same photo.

Guest Blogs

I wrote and sent the eighth of the nine guest posts I scheduled. Next week, some will go live. I’ve noted the go-live dates on my Excel worksheet and calendar. I’ll promote my hosts’ blog and respond to comments on my go-live dates. Hosts appreciate guests being active on their blogs.

Book Marketing Diary – Entry 6: Ask David Tweets & other actual promotion activities. Click to tweet.

How successful have you found Tweeting for promoting books?

Amazon Link

Amanda Larrowe’s lack of trust sabotages her relationships. The English teacher and award-winning author of middle-grade adventure books for boys has shut off communication with friends and family to meet her January 2 book deadline. Now, in the deepest snow accumulation Richmond, Virginia has experienced in years, Camden Lancaster moves in across the street. After ten years, her heart still smarts from the humiliating aftermath of their perfect high school Valentine’s Day date. He may have transformed into a handsome, amiable man, but his likeability doesn’t instill trust in Amanda’s heart. When Cam doesn’t recognize her on their first two encounters, she thinks it’s safe to be his fair-weather neighbor. Boy is she wrong.

7 Tips to Mellow You in Your Daunting Book Marketing Plan

“My theory is that every little bit has the potential to help. We just have to learn where to focus our limited time and energy, because obviously we can’t do it all.” —Jody Hedlund

mage courtesy of debspoons at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of debspoons at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I’m up against developing and executing my marketing plan for my debut novel. I awake clenching my teeth.

Whether you’re writing a book or have received a contract, is marketing your book a heavy cloud hovering over your head?

7 Tips to Help Calm You

Tip 1. For over a year, I’ve saved emails from writers’ email loops and my subscriptions to book-promotion blogs. These emails contain others’ experiences or links to posts, articles, and websites I might use in promoting my novel.

Image courtesy of mapichai at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of mapichai at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

I’ve also collected workshop handouts and purchased how-to e-books.

Examples: Emails that recommend website designers, give newsletter writing tips, or provide links to order bookmarks. An e-book showing how to use Twitter in a marketing plan.

Ahh. Most of my research is already at my fingertips.

Tip 2. About six months from my book’s release date, I scheduled weekly readings from my saved items in Tip 1. Now promotion ideas, how-tos, and processes are fast becoming familiar.

Ahh. I’ve gained confidence in what I need to do.

Tweetable

  • Learning steps, details, and processes lessens our marketing-plan stress. click to tweet
Image courtesy of iosphere at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of iosphere at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Tip 3. From my readings in Tip 2, I listed all the projects I could do to promote my novel.

Ahh. I got them all out there so none lurk to worry me later.

Tip 4. I assigned the tasks from Tip 3 to the months I’ll need to work on them. Wow. About 375 tasks over six months!

Family, health, and excellence of projects are more important than doing all the tasks. So, I determined the projects that were MUSTS.

Examples: Obtaining a website. Getting book endorsements. Scheduling interviews on blogs that readers frequent.

From the information I gathered in Tip 1, I tagged additional projects experts said were worth the effort. Then, I noted which months were overloaded. From these two factors, I chose the projects I’d pursue.

Image courtesy of jesadaphorn at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of jesadaphorn at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Examples: Focus mainly on Twitter. Join a meet-the-authors Facebook party. Hold a local launch party.

I may implement the rejected projects on my next book’s marketing plan.

Examples: A blog tour. Writing articles for publications. A Facebook launch party.

Ahh. I’ve whittled down the projects I’m going to work on.

 

Tweetable

  • Excellence doesn’t mean you have to do everything to promote your book. click to tweet

Tip 5. Now, I’m scheduling needed people for my projects. I’m doing this early so this task doesn’t loom over me.

Examples: Hosts and helpers for the local book launch party. An artist to “beautify” my give-away baskets containing novel-related goodies. Local bookstore owner to schedule events.

Ahh. I feel like I have a team behind me. 

by colossus
by colossus

Tip 6. I always start a week with a written list of tasks I’ll complete each day. I make sure tasks are “bites” of the project, not projects in themselves.

I’m mindful not to sabotage my progress by starting unscheduled tasks because they’re “good” or fun to do.

Ahh. I can relax. Time is scheduled for each task.

Tweetable

  • Often we’re overwhelmed because we work on unscheduled, “good” tasks. click to tweet

Tip 7. For me, praying God’s direction on everything is a must.

Ahh. I’m in His will.

How do you add serenity to your marketing plan?