How to Increase Visitors to Your Blog in Less Than 13 Words

“Yet nothing in the marketing mix is more important than a strong title. —Michael Hyatt

 

Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Stuart Miles at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Hurray! Hurray! This post is the 100th I’ve written. Because I have guests on my blog, I’ve published more than 100 posts, but this is a milestone for me!

I looked back at my early posts. Five posts did well at the time of publishing and continued to be viewed more often than others over the past couple of years.

Tweetable

I believe the titles made these blog posts popular over time. Click to tweet.

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5 Reasons I Don’t Care I Lost Money Self-Publishing(Blog #14)
Many in my audience are writers. They’ve probably considered self-publishing.

4 Crucial Elements That Make Your Audience Talk Up Your Creative Work(Blog #24)
Who wouldn’t want more people talking up their work?

4 Ways to Free Yourself from Procrastination in Your Creative Endeavors(Blog #27)
Who wouldn’t want to be free from evil procrastination?

4 Choices That Improve Your Perseverance(Blog #25)
Perseverance is a coveted commodity.

2 Tips to Pump Up Your Flat Characters in Your Story (Blog #28)

My Son's just purchased 1970 Chevelle
My Son’s just purchased 1970 Chevelle

Actually, the tag, Chevelle, that I included on this post, boosted this one to the all-time high number of views.

For over a year, this post received weekly views and spurred several emails from Chevelle-loving men. One wanted to buy our junked Winnebego mentioned in the content.

Including a word repeated often in the content (Chevelle) in my tags, showed SEO works.

Note Two Important Characteristics:

  • All titles have a number in them. Number of reasons, elements, ways, choices, and tips. In addition to “How to,” giving the number of items is particularly effective.
  • All titles told what benefits people would receive from the content. (4 directly; 1 indirectly) This is a must.

Tweetable

Work as hard on your post title as you do your content. Click to tweet.

Join me in celebrating Blog #100. What is the title of the most popular blog post you wrote and published? (Please no guest blogs whose titles’ effectiveness are masked by the promotion efforts of your guests.)

4 Ways to Free Yourself from Procrastination in Your Creative Endeavors

“Procrastination is opportunity’s natural assassin.” –Victor Kiam

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We don’t plan to procrastinate. We want to fulfill our obligations and move forward. But too often we don’t.

Let’s face it. Procrastination is a weird kind of selfishness, because it robs others and us of benefits and joy.

Fear is often the root of procrastination. What are we so afraid of?

  • Fear the work isn’t the right thing to do
  • Fear the work will be overwhelming
  • Fear we don’t know how to do the work right
  • Fear we’ll abandon the work

If these fears muck up our minds, we need to do something about what we allow in our thoughts. 

4 Ways to Free Yourself from Procrastination

mp900398793.jpg1. Prevention. Take a half hour and list:

  • what you like to do,
  • what you’re good at,
  • what you believe in,
  • what challenges you in a good way, and
  • what you’re called to do.

For help, see 4 Choices That Improve Your Perseverance. Let’s call this list your Character Manifesto. Be honest.

Remember, work ends up on our plates because we say yes to someone’s request or our eyes light up at some work that looks interesting, noble, or lucrative. So, stop before committing to anything and ask yourself: Does my Character Manifesto support this job? If it doesn’t, it’s likely not the right thing to do. So, say no thank you, or think and pray about it before committing.

You’re less likely to procrastinate on work associated with items on your Character Manifesto.

id-10055355.jpg2. Planning. Once you’ve committed to a wise number of right projects, you can prevent them from looming. Even if you dislike planning, you can jot down what projects are due in the next few months. And under each project, what tasks need to be accomplished. Then decide what tasks you need to get done next week.

I can’t stress this enough: assign a sufficient block of time for each task. You already know your most likely interruptions, so wisely plan that block of time around them. Then forget about all tasks except the one assigned for the current block of time.

You know all tasks have been assigned a block of your time, so you can relax and actually look forward to and enjoy your next task.

mp900442329.jpg3. Permission. Now that you’ve assigned sufficient time on your schedule for the right jobs, you need to address niggling thoughts you may fail at doing them right.

Train your thinking. Give yourself permission to ask for help when needed. That’s so smart. To view the task as an adventure. That’s so fun. To realize failure can be a great learning experience for the next attempt. That’s so freeing.

Who better to do the task than you: it fits your Character Manifesto, you’ll get needed help, and you’ll look forward to hindsight if your adventure turns out different than planned.

mp900401598.jpg4. Accountability. You’ve scheduled the right jobs and have given yourself permission to enjoy the work and accept the outcomes. Yet, you fear disappointing people if you get bogged down in other things and fail to finish projects.

Turn your fear into constructive action. Create or join an accountability group that has no investments in your projects.

Your accountability partners have little concern about the success of your projects. They expect you to complete what you determined were the right things to do. Your weekly reports to your group should show them you planned well and worked as planned.

Members can help you look at your pressures and problems more objectively and make suggestions to get you back on track. Plus, they’ll cheer you on.

Having accountability partners helps you to plan well and do what you planned to do.

What works for you to give procrastination the boot?