How Do Readers Find Books They Want to Read?

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You can’t wait to read the next engaging book. How do you find that novel?

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In today’s world, whether authors are traditionally published or self-published, we must invest time and money in promoting our books. It would be helpful if we could put out resources into activities that help readers find books they want to read.

 

 

I’d like to know how you go about finding novels you want to read. I’ve created a list of possibilities below.

 

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If you would be so kind, would you write the list numbers of the two or three you mostly use into the comments section and post the comment? Or write in ones I haven’t listed that you use. That would be helpful also.

 

 

 

In a future post, if I have enough responses to tell us something, I’ll share the results from the comments.

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How I Find Books I Want to Read

  1. Peruse bookstores
  2. Attend book fairs
  3. Find recommendations in newspapers or other publications
  4. Act on recommendations from other readers (word of mouth)
  5. Investigate books announced through emails from authors about new books, or deals on old ones
  6. Subscribe and use suggestions from authors’ newsletters
  7. Investigate books mentioned in authors’ sidebars on their blogs or websites
  8. Read mainly series and get the next book in the series
  9. Click on “Customers who bought this book, also bought …” (Amazon ads)
  10. Click on “Sponsored products related to this item …” (Amazon ads)
  11. Click on Facebook ads
  12. Click on Twitter ads
  13. Click on Goodreads ads
  14. Look at reviews and recommendations on Goodreads
  15. Peruse reviews & star ratings on online bookstore sites (Amazon, CBD, B&N)
  16. Attend Facebook parties to receive free giveaways
  17. Comment on blogs with giveaways to receive free books
  18. Belong to book sites that report deals in your genre (BookBub, Libroso)
  19. Belong to KindleUnlimited or a similar program.
  20. Go to Online Libraries
  21. Look for books on publishers’ sites
  22. Look for books by my favorite authors
  23. Investigate books promoted on Twitter
  24. Investigate books promoted on Facebook
  25. Subscribe to blogs that review books
  26. Belong to a site where I choose free books to review (Authors Cross-Promotion)
  27. Purchase box sets looking for new authors

Help learn how readers find books they want to read. Click to tweet.

Please share the way you locate your next fiction read in the comments. Thank you so much for participating.

Amazon Link

Amanda Larrowe’s lack of trust sabotages her relationships. The English teacher and award-winning author of middle-grade adventure books for boys has shut off communication with friends and family to meet her January 2 book deadline. Now, in the deepest snow accumulation Richmond, Virginia has experienced in years, Camden Lancaster moves in across the street. After ten years, her heart still smarts from the humiliating aftermath of their perfect high school Valentine’s Day date. He may have transformed into a handsome, amiable man, but his likeability doesn’t instill trust in Amanda’s heart. When Cam doesn’t recognize her on their first two encounters, she thinks it’s safe to be his fair-weather neighbor. Boy is she wrong.

Diary of a Book Marketing Plan Entry 2

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This is the second entry in the series in which I share the progress and tasks of my book-marketing plan for my second book coming out mid August. The first entry last week began with my setup tasks.

Tasks Performed This Past Week

  • I contacted 26 promising people to help me as influencers for Gift of the Magpie. So far, 14 have agreed to help me.
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Suggestion for Influencers

  • I sent email letters to my influencers, welcoming and thanking them and detailing 18 possible tasks they can do to help me. I suggested a mix, because some are strong in social media and others are not. I listed such things as:
    • Announce the book on their social media places and on emails to friends.
    • Write an honest review on Amazon, Goodreads, other bookstore sites, and include it in their emails to friends.
    • Follow my Amazon page.
    • Post the back cover blurb and the endorsements written for my book on their emails and social media spots.
    • Tweet and/or post to Facebook book quotes I send them.
    • Announce my giveaways and when the book is free or on sale.
    • Interview me on their blogs.
    • Know I’m available for speaking events.
    • Ask their local libraries to order the book.
    • Suggest my book to their book clubs.
    • Feature my cover temporarily on their Facebook header.
    • Distribute bookmarks.

Contacts for Announcements

• I created address labels for invitations to my local book launch party.

• I added email addresses collected from events held for my first book to my email list to announce my second book on the release date.

Designing and Ordering Promotional Materials

• I designed and ordered my bookmarks and business cards.

• I asked my publisher for the ISBN and other book information to design my postcards. I will give them to bookstores and libraries and send them as invitations to my book launch party. Bookstores and libraries appreciate the postcard because it has all the information they need to order books: Cover, title, ISBN, and my contact information.

Guest Blogs and Parties

• I drafted two more posts for blogs on which I’ll be a guest. I now have four posts drafted out of seven guest blog invitations.

• I prepared an agenda for the upcoming meeting with my helpers for the local book launch party. 

 

Keeping Me Straight

 

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• I updated my Excel Marketing spreadsheet – this is invaluable in keeping all my marketing efforts straight and remembering important information. 

º I added new tasks and subtasks. On each, I included contact person, cost, task due date, date I’ll work on the task (I added these dates to my calendar too), and other notes.

º Updated notes, needs, and progress on tasks already entered into the worksheet.

Over the next several weeks, as I record my efforts and progress for Gift of the Magpie, I’ll also include tips. I hope you’ll follow along and share your tips and thoughts too.

Diary of a book marketing experience—Entry 2: influencers and other promotion activities. Click to tweet.

Published authors please share with us. Which promotion activity was most helpful in giving your book exposure and sales?

Diary of a Book Marketing Plan – Setup

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My second book is releasing soon. As I researched and promoted my first book, I wrote a blog post giving 32 marketing ideas. Now, with more experience as to what worked and didn’t work for me, I’ll share my marketing experience for my second book as it unfolds. I hope you’ll join me for the next several weeks.

For Book 1, Calculated Risk, I performed all 32 of my suggestions. For some, I could’ve done more and for others I should’ve done less. I still recommend reading the 32 marketing ideas, because many were valuable.

Benefits Gained from Promoting Book 1

• Through purchasing Facebook ads, I better defined my audience from the ages and sexes of the people who clicked on my ads. Knowing my audience will help for Book 2 ads.

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• I accomplished much promotion setup work. For example, I have a website; I’ve joined social networks such as Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest; and I’ve set up my Amazon, Facebook, and Goodreads author pages. For Book 2, I will only need to update information at these places.

• I learned that romances don’t sell well at fairs and festivals, unless they are book fairs attended by readers. See my post on fairs and festivals.

• At bookstore signings and fairs, I learned it’s important not to sit behind a table, but to stand, pass out bookmarks, and engage people about what they like and need, and less about my books. For example, a woman interested in writing gave me her email address, and I sent her information on a local writers’ group. She’s on my list to email about Book 2.

• I discovered which promotion tasks were worthwhile, even if some were uncomfortable for this introvert.

Book 2 Tasks I’ve Done So Far

•I sent out PDF’s of the book to 6 possible endorsers and obtained 2 authors able to read the book and write endorsements. Many authors want to help, but they’re up against deadlines.

• I grabbed a fifteen-minute appointment with the CEO of a publishing company at a writer’s conference. Believing online promoting is more successful than traditional marketing efforts, he recommended I spend my time and money on online ads and getting Amazon reviews quickly.

• According to the CEO’s recommendations, I researched several online promotion options. My husband and I met and decided which I would invest money and time in. I’ll mention them in upcoming posts.

• I setup my marketing Excel spreadsheet to enter promotion tasks, deadlines, requirements, and progress.

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• For my local book launch party (it’s not all about online presence): I’ve enlisted helpers, set up a meeting with them, and reserved the party place.

• I signed up to write a guest post, do an interview, or be spotlighted on 6 blogs. I’ve drafted two.

• Drafted email content to recruit potential book influencers. I’ve listed 28 people.

• I received my book cover recently. This opens up my ability to start working on several promotion projects.

As I record my efforts and progress for Book 2, Gift of the Magpie, in upcoming posts, I’ll include tips and hope you’ll follow along and share your tips and thoughts too.

Diary of a book marketing experience: promotion activities and progress. Click to tweet.

What are the promotion activities you enjoy and which do you dread? Why?