3 Steps to Find a Romantic Idea for Your Creative Activity

“Opposites attract. If two people just alike get married, one of you is unnecessary.” —Larry Burkett

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

You’re preparing a talk to a women’s group. Or writing a romantic scene. Or composing a song. Where will you find a romantic idea to entice your female audiences?

Here are 3 Steps to come up with a romantic idea for your creative work.

Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Salvatore Vuono at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Step 1. Write What You Know

Who do you know better than your spouse? You don’t have to go back to those budding-romance days. Look at why you love your spouse now.

Step 2. Use Opposites Attract

People love stories about how men differ from women. It’s romantic. So, list ways you’re different from your spouse. When you get about fifty…just kidding…ten, stop. Here’s mine:

1. He enjoys people. I’ve considered building a monument to the person who invented email.

2. He is a man of few words. That’s because I hog all the rest.

3. He finally comments on what I said five minutes ago. I’ve already forgotten what I said and moved on to my next idea.

4. He’s always right. I supply him with numerous opportunities, but I’ve reserved a billboard for the glorious day he’s WRONG.

Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

5. He analyzes how to put gutters on our house. I analyze everything else.

6. He takes hot showers so long I can’t find my way out of the bathroom. To save on electrical costs, I freshen up in his steam wondering why my hair doesn’t hold a curl.

7. He leaves a mushy card on my favorite chair on Valentine’s Day. When I find it, I race upstairs, cut out two harts, glue them together, and slap a doily on it, tea stain down, and finish it off with, “I love you.”

8. He laughs at my humor. I force weak smiles while he over-explains the way things work.

9. He does the grocery shopping, if I make the list. I question why he didn’t know “romaine in a bag” meant the easy pre-cut version and not a humongous stalk of romaine that barely fits in the vegetable drawer and happens to be sold in a bag.

10. He never tells embarrassing stories on me. I use this godly man as fodder for my social media posts.

Step 3. Recall a story.

Image courtesy of xedos4 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of xedos4 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

For each difference, recall a story that proves you’re different in that area.

Here’s mine for number 5:

At our last house, John stood in the backyard, staring up at the roof for a lo-o-o-ng time. I couldn’t fathom what the man was doing. I asked. The expert who configures the gutters for houses was coming the next day. Our roof had funky levels. John wanted to figure it out before the EXPERT came. Do you know what? When the EXPERT showed John his configuration, John suggested his own and the expert agreed it was better!

Now you see why I listed number 4. But I have to admit I my heart tingled that my man bested the gutter expert.

From this story, I can use a similar situation for my fictional hero. Because I know my feelings from my scoffing in the beginning to my tingles at the end, I can give my heroine those feelings.

What’s a story you could use for a creative activity?

3 Elements Your Creative Work Needs to Stir Hope and Renewal

“Perhaps the greatest psychological, spiritual, and medical need that all people have is the need for hope.” — Billy Graham

Girl Holding Plant

When you hear a song, view a painting, or read a story don’t you want to be moved? Don’t you want your experience to be worthwhile—to understand a new truth about life or have one confirmed? Receive an ah-ha that changes your life for the better? Isn’t that part of the entertainment you expect?

Let’s look at the three elements a creative work must have to stir hope and renewal.

3 Elements to Stir Hope and Renewal

1. The Creative Work Must Give a Hint of a Basic Need.

fisherman

In one of my mom’s paintings, a fisherman, dressed in a muted yellow rain slicker and boots, stands in a river, his fishing pole extended. The glassy water reflects a sunless sky. Gray stone buildings stand tall and sturdy on one bank. Down the river a brown bridge constructed of brick arches spans the river.

The possible needs hinted are:

  • Food source
  • Protection from the weather
  • Sturdy shelter
  • Rain for the earth
  • A way to cross the river
  • Solitude to renew one’s spirit

These needs draw me into the picture. I want to go inside the buildings and hope a fire blazes against the damp day. I hope and want to see the fisherman catch a fish to take home. I want to walk across the bridge and look down into the water.

2. The Creative Work Must Give Glimpses of Good and of Hope

In the story I’m writing, a young woman has put herself in a predicament because of her reaction to a deep hurt she’s experienced. Among all the obstacles and setbacks to overcome her mess, I show glimpses of how she can heal and become whole again, even if at some points she’s not ready yet to make the right choices.

Image courtesy of Zuzzuillo at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
Image courtesy of Zuzzuillo at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The painting of the fisherman gives a glimpse he can provide food for his family. His slicker and boots keep him dry. He may be renewing his spirit in his solitude. God has provided rain for the nourishment of his surroundings.

3. The Creative Work Must Satisfy Within the Realm of Reality

The painting didn’t show the fisherman catching a fish, but we know it’s possible, and that’s satisfying. The day is overcast, but we know the earth needs rain and the sun will shine again.

SunriseBlog

A story may have an unhappy ending. But if the choices the main character makes shows the ending is the only one likely without a miracle, the ending can be satisfying to most people. Such a story may move readers to make better decisions or raise their children to make good choices.

Personally, I prefer a story that shows us how the character overcomes obstacles and gives us ways to improve others’ and our lives. For me, the overcoming includes a growing faith and trust in God.

A creative work can renew us when it shows a need, glimpses of what is good in relation to the need, and leaves us with a measure of realistic hope and renewal.

What have you seen in a creative work that was behind the hope and renewal you experienced?