Writers, Tap a Spouse to Help with Your Writing Career

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Don’t discount this viable option. It could work for your family. I never expected the help husband John has provided me.

Stage 1

When I started my writing career, John and I worked as actuaries. John was supportive in:

· the time I spent writing, and

· the cost and time I spent going to writers’ conferences. 

That’s all I needed.

Stage 2

We retired and moved to a rural community in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Writing for me became a full time job. I received two contracts, was building a platform, and learning how to market my books. John was supportive in doing the:

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·shopping,

· laundry, and 

· vacuuming

so I could write.

This was a huge help, but my marketing and platform work began eating into my writing time.

Stage 3


I started traveling to fairs and festivals. John was supportive in:

· driving me to the venues and

· selling the books at my table

so I could visit with readers.

With his presence, I was more comfortable attending these events.

Stage 4


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I had two more contracts and invitations to write for collections. And deadlines. I went indie with a series. I’d learned more about online marketing opportunities that I couldn’t take advantage of because I had no time. John was supportive and became my:

· marketing manager,

· chief financial officer (love those spread sheets that spit out my sales tax and book sales),

· tech researcher,

· meme maker,

· cover & bookmark designer,

· conference marketing workshops attendee,

· galley reader, and

· document reviewer

· KDP publishing tech

so I could focus on writing and platform tasks.

Advantages


As business partners, 

· we do smarter marketing, using our time and money resources more wisely,

· we communicate more during my writing day,

· my stress level is less,

· fewer error and typos make it to such documents as my written interviews when I’m a guest on blogs and in book galleys,

· we’re able to get more books out, which is the most important marketing effort.

Possibilities for Spouses


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Your spouse may not be as industrious as John has become, but your spouse may be able and willing to help with some things. A house chore as simple as loading and unloading the dishwasher or taking over trash duty provides minutes to a spouse’s writing time. 

I promote my blog posts on Hootsuite, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and to certain writer groups. It’s a fifteen-minute weekly task, but those fifteen-minute tasks quickly build into hours. I write the promotion content when I write the blog posts. So this blog promotion task is an easy job that anyone could do. 

I post a weekly personal photo from what’s happened in my life on my Facebook author page. This allows me to enter into fun discussions with those who’ve liked my page. Sometimes I’m working on a deadline and have no available photos and must stop writing and find something interesting to snap. This could consume a half hour or more. 

Perhaps your spouse could help with these kinds of tasks.

What are writing career tasks your spouse helps with or could help with?

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Suddenly unemployed, Allie Masterson returns home to Cary, North Carolina where she caddies for her father on the PGA Seniors Tour. There, she encounters a man who possesses an alluring gift of reading the contours of the green. Fascinated with his uncanny ability, Allie is excited to meet the Green Whisperer—until she discovers that the easygoing caddy is actually Shoo Leonard, the boy who teased her relentlessly when they were kids. Despite Allie’s reservations, when Shoo is faced with having to overcome a hand injury, she agrees to use her sport science degree to become his trainer…and then she falls for him.

 Shoo Leonard is grateful to Allie for her singular determination to get him ready for the PGA tour, but he isn’t ready for anything more. Still raw from a broken engagement and focused on his career, he’s content to be her fist-bumping buddy…but then he falls for her.

What seems like a happily-ever-after on the horizon takes a turn when Allie decides she’s become a distraction to Shoo’s career. Is it time for her to step away or can The Putting Green Whisperer find the right words to make her stay?

Words Misused – Part 3: The Real Meaning of These Words

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This is the final post in my Words Misused series. Here’s a list of words many people use with an incorrect meaning in mind. I use The Merriam-Webster Dictionary.

Often Misused Words

Appraise: to set a value on. Not to inform.

Bemuse: bewilder or confuse. Not to amuse.

Dichotomy: a division or the process of dividing into two mutually exclusive or contradictory groups. Not disagreement, difference or discrepancy.

Enervate: to lessen the strength or vigor of; weaken in mind or body. Not energize.

Enormity: an outrageous, vicious, or immoral act. Not enormousness.

Fortuitous: happening by chance. Not fortunate.

Infamous: having a reputation of the worst kind; disgraceful. Not being famous.

Luxuriant: yielding or growing abundantly. Not luxurious.

Mitigate: to make less harsh, hostile, severe, or painful. Not to have weight or effect. 

Noisome: harmful, unwholesome; offensive to the senses. Not noisy.

Nonplussed: puzzled or perplexed. Not calm.

Penultimate: next to the last. Not the ultimate.

Opportunism: taking advantage of opportunities or circumstances especially with little regard for principles or ultimate consequences. Not creating opportunities.

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Poisonous: a substance that through its chemical action can injure or kill. Not venomous.

Practicable: capable of being put into practice, done, or accomplished. Not practical.

Proscribe: outlaw; to condemn or forbid as harmful. Not recommend.

Protagonist: the principal character in a drama or story; a leader or supporter of a cause. Not one who argues in favor of something.

Refute: to prove to be false by argument or evidence. Not by conjecture.

Simplistic: excessively simple, tending to overlook complexities. Not being simple.

Unexceptionable: not open to exception or objection, beyond reproach. Not ordinary.

Untenable: not being held, maintained, or defended. Not unbearable.

Verbal: of, relating to, or consisting of words; especially having to do with words rather than with the ideas to be conveyed. Not oral.

What’s a word you’ve heard or seen used with an incorrect meaning?

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Words Misused – Part 2: Incorrect Construction of Common Phrases

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Although many common phrases have become clichés, if we use them in our writing, we should use the right word for the meaning of the phrase. Here’s a list of phrases writers often misuse.

Often Misused Phrases

Another think coming not another thing coming. Comes from, “If you have an incorrect thought, you’d better think again.”

Bated breath not baited breath. One doesn’t bait their breath with worms.

By accident not on accident. The first means accidently. On accident is common in speaking, but considered incorrect in writing.

Case in point not case and point. You’re about to give an example to reinforce your point.

Champing at the bit not chomping at the bit. Champ means to chew noisily.

Could have/should have not could of/ should of. The contractions could’ve/should’ve throw us off.

Couldn’t care less not could care less, unless you mean you could care even less than you do.

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Did a complete 180 not did a complete 360. For turning completely away from something, you wouldn’t turn in a circle to where you started.

Enamored of not enamored by, because then the person after the by thinks a lot of you.

Exact revenge not extract revenge. Exact compels to furnish or call for revenge. Extract pulls out revenge.

Fall by the wayside not fall by the waste side. The meaning isn’t to fall in a trash pile.

For all intents and purposes not for all intensive purposes, unless you intend to say the purposes are intense.

Hear, hear not here, here. The phrase was originally a cheer for “hear him, hear him.”

Hold your peace not hold your piece. (See say your piece)

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Home in not hone in. Home in like homing pigeons direct themselves to their home targets.

In regard to not in regards to. The plural is found in as regards, which also means with respect to.

Loath to not loathe to. Loathe means to dislike greatly. Loath means to be unwilling or reluctant.

On tenterhooks not on tender hooks. Hooks aren’t tender.

One and the same not one in the same. The first says two things are the same; the second says a thing is inside itself.

Repository of information not suppository of information. Suppository is something you insert. [Smile.]

Say your piece not say your peace. (See hold your peace.)

Self-deprecating not self-depreciating. Undervaluing oneself not ones value is diminishing.

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Sleight of hand not slight of hand. Sleight means trick or dexterity. Slight means slender.

Sneak peek not sneak peak. It means an opportunity to see something before it’s officially available.

Statute of limitations not statue of limitationsStatute is a law enacted by a legislative body; statue is a body made of a solid substance.

Supposed to not suppose to. The d gets dropped often when speaking the phrase and confuses the written phrase.

Toe the line not tow the line. Athletes are required to place their toes to the starting line. When someone toes the line, they’re doing what’s expected—an accepted standard.

Used to not use to. (See supposed to.)

Waiting for not waiting on. Wait for a friend versus wait on a customer.

Whet your appetite not wet your appetite. Whet means stimulate.

Wreak havoc not wreck havoc. Wreck would destroy the havoc.

What are other phrase you’ve seen written incorrectly?

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Suddenly unemployed, Allie Masterson returns home to Cary, North Carolina where she caddies for her father on the PGA Seniors Tour. There, she encounters a man who possesses an alluring gift of reading the contours of the green. Fascinated with his uncanny ability, Allie is excited to meet the Green Whisperer—until she discovers that the easygoing caddy is actually Shoo Leonard, the boy who teased her relentlessly when they were kids. Despite Allie’s reservations, when Shoo is faced with having to overcome a hand injury, she agrees to use her sport science degree to become his trainer…and then she falls for him.

 Shoo Leonard is grateful to Allie for her singular determination to get him ready for the PGA tour, but he isn’t ready for anything more. Still raw from a broken engagement and focused on his career, he’s content to be her fist-bumping buddy…but then he falls for her.

What seems like a happily-ever-after on the horizon takes a turn when Allie decides she’s become a distraction to Shoo’s career. Is it time for her to step away or can The Putting Green Whisperer find the right words to make her stay?